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  • Light Painting with Roomba Vacuum Cleaners
    Published: July 3, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Light Painting with Roomba Vacuum Cleaners robots photography lighting

    Light Painting with Roomba Vacuum Cleaners robots photography lighting

    Light Painting with Roomba Vacuum Cleaners robots photography lighting

    Light Painting with Roomba Vacuum Cleaners robots photography lighting

    Light Painting with Roomba Vacuum Cleaners robots photography lighting

    These photos have apparently been around for a while, but this is totally new to me. An enterprising group of robotic vacuum cleaner owners have used LEDs affixed to the top of their Roombas to create these amazing long exposure photographs. Check out Roomba art group for more. Photos via IBR Roomba, Mike Bala, and Steve Doll. (via laughing squid)

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  • Log
    Published: July 3, 2011
    Source: BLDGBLOG
    [Image: Log Chop Bench by the Practice of Everyday Design].

    For their project Log Chop Bench (2011), the Canadian design firm The Practice of Everyday Design used "a logger's brute strength and surgical precision to carve out seats on a reclaimed log."

    [Image: Log Chop Bench by the Practice of Everyday Design].

    Seats made from "fine, hand-sewn upholstery by a motorcycle saddle maker" were then added to the spaces chopped into the log, creating a surreally massive piece of high-end furniture.

    Here is the log's chopper—a lumberjill—in action, as well as the sketch it was all based on.

    [Images: Log Chop Bench by the Practice of Everyday Design].

    Resulting in this:

    [Image: Log Chop Bench by the Practice of Everyday Design].

    I would love to see a movie theater or lecture hall furnished with two or three dozen of these, with higher backs for long-term seating but each individual perch unique.

    Other projects are viewable at the Practice of Everyday Design's website.
  • Intentionally flawed goods
    Published: July 1, 2011
    Source: kottke.org

    Artist Jeremy Hutchison commissioned a series of intentionally incorrect products from factories around the world.

    "I asked them to make me one of their products, but to make it with an error," Hutchison explains. "I specified that this error should render the object dysfunctional. And rather than my choosing the error, I wanted the factory worker who made it to choose what error to make. Whatever this worker chose to do, I would accept and pay for."

    Hutchison received a comb without tines, the ordering of which prompted a letter from the confused factory rep:

    I have read your email, which makes me confused. As you know, combs shold be fabricated correctly and customers should like to buy combs which can comb hair. However, from your words, it seems you need us to fabricate combs incorrectly and combs can not comb the hair. I can not understand this well. Pls kindly explain detailedly.

    There is also a Magritte-esque pipe with no place to put tobacco, and these impractial sunglasses:

    Incorrect sunglasses

    (via @kevmaguire)

    Tags: art   Jeremy Hutchison
  • Dear Photograph by Taylor Jones
    Published: July 2, 2011
    Source: Design Milk

    Dear Photograph by Taylor Jones
    “Dear Photograph,
    Disney will always be magical, no matter what age.”

    Taylor Jones has a blog called Dear Photograph in which he holds up old photos in the exact location that they were taken, bringing the past back to life. With each photograph, the owner of the image makes a statement about the photo. At first he was just posting his own photos, but now he gets tons of email submissions from all over the world. He is now hard at work on a book.

    Dear Photograph by Taylor Jones

    “Dear Photograph,
    This was the best day. 650 days and counting…”

    Dear Photograph by Taylor Jones

    “Dear Photograph,
    I’ll always remember the summers in that truck.”

    Dear Photograph by Taylor Jones

    “Dear Photograph,
    Dad never took a picture of me, ever. Then I noticed his reflection in the glass.
    Happy Father’s Day, Dad.”

    Dear Photograph by Taylor Jones

    “Dear Photograph,
    I miss that playground.”


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    © 2011 Design Milk | Posted by Jaime in Art | Permalink | 4 comments
  • Video: What The NYPD Does With Confiscated Fireworks (Hint: Boom!)
    Published: July 2, 2011
    Source: Gothamist
    Video: What The NYPD Does With Confiscated Fireworks (Hint: Boom!) Setting off fireworks without a permit in NYC is illegal, which means the NYPD has been busy confiscating them during the annual July 4th fireworks crackdown. While there's a special focus on Staten Island's fondness for illicit pyrotechnics that make neighborhoods "war zones," fireworks are being grabbed everywhere, which means the police have a stockpile of fireworks. Which they destroy! Check out this video of the bomb squad setting off 5,000 pounds of them at the NYPD firing range in the Bronx. [ more › ]

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  • Sweatshop: Tower Defense Meets Designer Clothes Guilt
    Published: June 30, 2011
    Source: GameSetWatch

    Digital agency Littleloud and Channel 4 are teaming up again (you might remember their previous collaboration The Curfew) for Sweatshop an online strategy game that's sure to make you feel like a jerk, as you play the manager of a sweatshop producing designer clothes for the UK s high-street stores.

    Despite its appalling premise, it looks like a lighthearted affair with graphics by the esteemed Gary Lucken (Army of Trolls) and a Tower Defense mechanic that challenges you to balance the demands of your Western clients with the welfare of the children slaving away in your sweatshop.

    "Should you hire a fire officer to prevent the risk of workers dying horribly in an industrial blaze or pack them in to get the job done? Should you train workers to make them more efficient and satisfied or fire them when they lose a limb in an industrial accident?

    How do you motivate workers: with generous treats and toilet breaks or with an iron fist, long hours and verbal abuse? Maybe you just want to buy a bunch of robots to do the job instead, forcing your human workforce into deeper poverty.

    As the player journeys through the game, the story of the characters evolve and the sweatshop grows, moving into ever new larger premises with all the complications of management this entails."You should be able to play Sweatshop, and learn all about the unsavory truths behind the fast fashion industry and the sweatshop system, at this site soon.

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  • Creative Review - The making of a Coca-Cola neon sign, 1954
    Published: June 29, 2011
  • Otherworldly Paper Sculptures by Chun Kwang Young
    Published: June 28, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Otherworldly Paper Sculptures by Chun Kwang Young sculpture paper art
    (click images for detail)

    Otherworldly Paper Sculptures by Chun Kwang Young sculpture paper art

    Otherworldly Paper Sculptures by Chun Kwang Young sculpture paper art

    Otherworldly Paper Sculptures by Chun Kwang Young sculpture paper art

    Otherworldly Paper Sculptures by Chun Kwang Young sculpture paper art

    Otherworldly Paper Sculptures by Chun Kwang Young sculpture paper art

    Sculptor Chun Kwang Young uses a seemingly infinite quantity of small foam wedges wrapped in Korean mulberry paper to create imposing, meteoric installations that seem to crack and splinter like fractals. Via the New York Times:

    Chun’s preference for using natural dyes and handmade mulberry paper was born from childhood memories of his uncle’s pharmacy, where small medicinal herb parcels that were similarly wrapped with paper and hung in tight clusters from the ceiling in order to protect them from insects. [...] “I love nature and I want to live my life in harmony with nature,” he said. “Our ancestors lived modestly and simply, and thought all lives should be respected. “I hope my work can take this traditional Korean message forward to modern society.”

    Like yesterday’s paintings by Kim Hyo-Suk it’s difficult to imagine without seeing these in person that they’re actually real. (images courtesy ravenel, nate dorr, and mu-um)

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    [Sponsor] When clients are unruly, point to the warning of the evils of bad design that you won in the Bad Design Destroys Poster Giveaway drawing.

  • Block Type Experiment
    Published: June 29, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Block Type Experiment wood typography design

    Block Type Experiment wood typography design

    Block Type Experiment wood typography design

    Block Type Experiment wood typography design

    Block Type Experiment wood typography design

    OK this is the last physical typography project for awhile, I promise. At first glance these wooden letters appear to be nothing more than a few blocks organized on a table to create a standard alphabet. However the letters are actually illusions of perspective, viewable only from the photographed angle, certain elements stacked high while others layered below are actually far in the background. Neat! See also Jérôme Haldemann’s toothpick type project for a similar idea. (via ignant)

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    [Sponsor] When clients are unruly, point to the warning of the evils of bad design that you won in the Bad Design Destroys Poster Giveaway drawing.

  • SOME THINGS PRESENTS: & HE WENT TO THE SEA IN HIS CARRIAGE & HORSES
    Published: June 29, 2011

    -3 -4 SOMESLASHTHINGS SECRET 05
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    SOMESLASHTHINGS SECRET 06 joseph dirand marble furniture as its being put together
    SOMESLASHTHINGS SECRET 10 SOMETHINGS DESIGN drawer cabinet

    AN EXHIBITION INSPIRED BY THE LIFE & WORK OF RAIMONDO DI SANGRO / PRINCE OF SAN SEVERO, ALCHEMIST, SCIENTIST, MAGICIAN, HERETIC.

    & HE WENT TO THE SEA IN HIS CARRIAGE & HORSES WILL FEATURE A VARIETY OF OBJECTS FROM THE ARCHIVES, IN ADDITION TO THOSE CREATED EXCLUSIVELY FOR SOME/THINGS BY ARTISTS & DESIGNERS AS DIVERSE AS ADRIEN DIRAND, AMINE EON AMHARECH, AOI KOTSUHIROI, BERNARD DELETTREZ, BERNHARD EDMAIER, BORIS BIDJAN SABERI, DEBRA BAXTER, DUSTIN EDWARD ARNOLD & NICHOLAS ALAN COPE, GREG CHAIT / THE ELDER STATESMAN, GUIDI, JOSEPH DIRAND, KEI KAGAMI, MICHELE LAMY, MAURIZIO ALTIERI / CARPE DIEM, NICOLAS ANDREAS TARALIS & NORA RENAUD, NICHOLAS JULITTA, PARIS KAIN / ABRAXAS REX, PAUL HARNDEN, RICK OWENS, & VALUS ARCHIVA.

    THE EXHIBITION WILL ALSO LAUNCH A COLLECTION OF SOME/THINGS LIMITE/EDITIONS INTERIOR DESIGN OBJECTS. AN ONGOING PROJECT, SPECIALISING IN ARTISANAL WORKMANSHIP, UNIQUE HANDFINISHED TREATMENTS, AGED METALS, & WOODS.

    DIFFERING FROM THE PREVIOUS EXHIBITIONS, & HE WENT TO THE SEA IN HIS CARRIAGE & HORSES WILL DISPLAY ONLY 3 HUNG ARTWORKS / A SERIES OF STRIKING IMAGES OF VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS BY BERNHARD EDMAIER. ALL OTHER PRINTS & OBJECTS WILL BE LEFT FOR VISITORS TO DISCOVER WITHIN THE SPECIALLY CRAFTED FURNITURE & BOXES.

    THE EXHIBITION WILL SHOW SEVERAL EXCEPTIONAL SPECIMENS FROM ADALBERTO GIAZOTTO’S MINERAL COLLECTION; AS WELL AS PIECES BY ABRAXAS REX, ONE OF THE MOST INNOVATIVE JEWELLERY DESIGNERS, WHOSE USE OF RAW MINERALS & DECISIVE YET UNIQUE SHAPES & FORMS POSSESSES A TOTEMIC POWER, RESEMBLING ALCHEMIC RESEARCH MORE THAN TRADITIONAL JEWELLERY; PLUS ORNAMENTS BY DEBRA BAXTER, WHICH CREATE A FUSION BETWEEN CRYSTAL & FLUID HUMAN FORMS; & WORKS BY AOI KOTSUHIROI, UTILISING HAIR TO WEAVE EXQUISITE SHAPES— A SHAMANISTIC AESTHETIC WITH JAPANESE SOPHISTICATION.

    MAURIZIO ALTIERI WILL EXHIBIT A FURNITURE PIECE RESURRECTED FROM THE CARPE DIEM ARCHIVES— NEVER PREVIOUSLY PUT INTO PRODUCTION, NOW MADE
    AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AT SOME/THINGS— THE RESULT OF A CLOSE COLLABORATION BETWEEN SOME/THINGS & ALTIERI, BEGINNING WITH THE EXTENSIVE & INTIMATE FEATURE IN SOME/THINGS MAGAZINE CHAPTER004.

    & HE WENT TO THE SEA IN HIS CARRIAGE & HORSES ALSO CONTINUES THE CLOSE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOME/THINGS & THE HOUSE OF RICK OWENS & MICHELE LAMY, PRESENTING NEVER PREVIOUSLY SEEN OBJECTS. ADDITIONAL WORKS INCLUDE PAUL HARNDEN’S POLAROID PHOTOGRAPHS; 2 ENORMOUS ARCHITECTURAL FURNITURE PIECES, CRAFTED FROM EXQUISITE VEINED WHITE MARBLE, BY ARCHITECT JOSEPH DIRAND; AS WELL AS A SCULPTURAL DRESS BY KEI KAGAMI CREATED SPECIALLY FOR SOME/THINGS, MADE FROM A METALISED & RUSTED FABRIC, SUSPENDED IN A BACON-ESQUE FRAME; & AMINE EON AMHARECH’S WHITE
    CARRARE MARBLE CHAIRS, PRODUCED IN COLLABORATION WITH SPADACCINI.

    THE EXHIBITION PROVIDES A GLIMPSE INTO THE THEMES & AESTHETIC OF THE UPCOMING SOME/THINGS MAGAZINE CHAPTER005, WITH ADRIEN DI RAND’S STEPWELLS SERIES; AS WELL AS NICHOLAS ALAN COPE & DUSTIN EDWARD,ARNOLD’S PUTESCO PRINTS.

    EXHIBITION OPENING [INVITATION ONLY] 8-10PM THURSDAY JUNE 23RD
    AT SOME/THINGS SECRET / 16 VILLA GAUDELET 75011 PARIS +33147009190

  • Wholesale fabric shows: Premiere Vision or Texworld?
    Published: June 29, 2011
    I've received several emails from readers who plan to travel to New York this July to attend one of the wholesale fabric shows. If you're local, it's not a tough decision because you can walk both of them. For people flying in, that the shows are held a week apart makes choosing a bit more difficult. The two shows are Premiere Vision (July 13-14) and Texworld (July 19-21). One show isn't better than the other, each represents different value. Here's what I can tell you. I went to the Premiere Vision show in Paris (two years ago) but have never been to the PV New York show. I would imagine the NY show isn't quite as good as the Paris show (you'd be surprised how many people can't get visas or don't want a piece of the US market) but few would argue that PV NY is not the top tier designer fabric show in the US. Let me qualify that. Premiere Vision is a better choice if you have a fashion forward bridge or contemporary line with high price points, and have or aspire to have a presence in the EU or Asia. I liked the Paris show very much. See the review I wrote of it (do that enough times and you'd never need to buy a sourcing directory). The ambiance is professional and muted, very conducive to business (as is Texworld)

  • Published: June 25, 2011
  • Embroidered Toast
    Published: June 28, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Embroidered Toast food embroidery art

    Embroidered Toast food embroidery art

    Embroidered Toast food embroidery art

    The work of Judith G. Klausner is making the rounds today, specifically her Oreo Cameo series, but I was struck most by the absurd beauty of her embroidered toast pieces. She’s also mastered the art of Chex cereal needlepoint. (via quipsologies)

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    [Sponsor] When clients are unruly, point to the warning of the evils of bad design that you won in the Bad Design Destroys Poster Giveaway drawing.

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  • Cinemagraphs
    Published: June 16, 2011
    Source: Cool Hunting
    Photography duo capture fashion's poetic moments with animated GIFs
    JBKBCinemagraph-1.gif JBKBCinemagraph-2.gif

    Whether showing how to drop your pants or adding creepy slow-lidded blinks, animated GIFs perhaps come the closest to capturing the true essence of a moment—what photographic technology has often struggled to achieve since the first recorded image. NYC-based innovators Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg poetically attempt just that with their forward-thinking fashion photography that they've dubbed "cinemagraphs."

    JBKBCinemagraph-3.gif JBKBCinemagraph-4.gif

    Teaming up with high-fashion names such as Tiffany's and Christian Louboutin, Jamie and Kevin have created a whole new style of art for digital ads. The images sometimes lean towards the slightly fantastical—the shimmer on a pair of glitter-covered heels or the shadowy flicker of a film. Theirs is a perfect world that somehow collided with ours, creating sensations like the idealized ripple of a silk skirt that may not exist in reality but ought to.

    The beauty of their vision lies in its simplicity. Movements are so subtle (a model's hair blows in the wind, the gentle jostle of the subway, the flash of a passing car) as to not always be apparent at first glance, but closer scrutiny rewards you with these isolate moments of delight.

    JBKBCinemagraph-5.gif JBKBCinemagraph-6.gif

    "There's something magical about a still photograph," Jamie explains, calling them "a captured moment in time—that can simultaneously exist outside the fraction of a second the shutter captures." To see more cinemagraphs, check out Jamie's Tumblr.

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  • I’m not an artist
    Published: June 23, 2011

    I could stare at the I’m not an artist collection of animated GIFs all day long. Put together by Soon in Tokyo for the Elisava School of Design.

  • A Site Dedicated to the Color of the New York City Sky
    Published: June 22, 2011
    Source: Daily Intel

    Every five minutes, NSKYC, a site by web designer Mike Bodge, updates with a new snapshot of the average color of the city's sky at that moment. It may sound mundane, but the result is actually fascinating and beautiful. The page has been dominated by varying shades of gray today, but scroll down to the early morning hours to find vibrant blues around 5 a.m., or skip past the black of night for yesterday evening's maroon sunset.

    We reached out to Bodge for some details on how he came up with the concept:

    "My desk at work looks out onto a great view over Noho and the East Village. Every day I'm wow'd at not just the view itself, but also how quickly it changes hour by hour. I think a lot of New Yorkers draw inspiration from the skyline itself. I do a lot of small internet 'art' projects and the basic idea of tracking the sky popped into my head one day. It took a few iterations to boil it down to the simple form that it is in now of just the color blocks. It's something you can just look at and get it immediately."

    As for what's next, Bodge says he'd "like to expand it to some more cities and plot the colors across a map, or maybe do some installations based on it. We shall see."

    [NSKYC via Gothamist]

    Read more posts by Dan Amira

    Filed Under: photo op, nskyc

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  • THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF RENNIE ELLIS | NO STANDING, ONLY DANCING
    Published: June 23, 2011

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    Bon Scott & Angus Young, Atlanta, GA 1978 — Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Australian photographer Rennie Ellis (1940-2003), manifested his lust for life in the incredibly raw and titillating images of ’70s & ’8os that perfectly capture the heyday of Rock ‘n’ Roll rebellion, sexual experimentation, high fashion & tomfoolery. He eagerly exposed the gritty and honest underbelly of the times with an insider’s candor that is both magical and mesmerizing. A familiar fixture on the party scene, Rennie was widely accepted in social circles that placed him squarely in the middle of the action where he thrived on the energy– and always got the shots he wanted.

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    Dino Ferrari, Toorak Road 1976 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    “The thing with Rennie was that he was always having fun and would never miss an opportunity to take a photo. I remember being at Rennie’s 38th birthday in Prahran when the police turned up for a noise compliant. We were all pretty smashed and our natural reaction was to stop and be quiet. Not Rennie though. We saw him take a girl outside and start taking pictures of her sitting on the police car. He just wanted to get that shot. And, from what I can recall, the police stuck around for a few drinks too. That’s how people reacted to Rennie—everyone just instinctively felt comfortable around him.”

    –Rennie’s old friend Jenny Bannister 

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    MC, Paradise Club, Kings Cross 1970-71 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Mr. Australia, Inflation Melbourne 1980 –  Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Lady Medina, The Ritz 1977 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    AC/DC, Atlanta, Georgia 1978 –  Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive
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    Jude’s Tongue 1978 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive
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    Jenny Bannister Shell Bikinis, Chai Parade 1978 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Tattoos, New York 1976 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Sheiks Disco, Melbourne 1981 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Night People, Middle Park 1975 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    At the Pub, Brisbane 1982 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Lindy Hobbs, Surfing World, Lorne c.1968 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Union Jack, Lorne c.1968 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Surfer boys & girls, Lorne, 1975 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive
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    Fitzroy Extrovert, 1974 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Cab Driver, Kings Cross 1970-71 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    No Standing Only Dancing 1974 – Image by © 2011 Rennie Ellis Photographic Archive

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    Rennie Ellis Archive

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  • Tumblr
    Published: June 23, 2011
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  • Manhattan Interzone
    Published: June 17, 2011
    Source: BLDGBLOG
    While we're on the subject of Domus #948, that issue also includes a short profile of Luc Sante's home book collection, including titles by Kafka, Walter Benjamin, and the Situationists. The article itself is by Gianluigi Ricuperati, a young writer who spoke long ago in the medieval days of Postopolis! New York and whose novel Il mio impero è nell'aria has recently been published in Italy.

    [Image: Luc Sante in his home writing room; note the copy of Learning From Las Vegas. Photo by Yoo Jean Han, courtesy of Domus].

    Back in 2007, meanwhile, in an interview with The Believer, Luc Sante suggested that New York "was a wild, one-in-a-million conjunction of circumstances, a sort of black pearl of world history, when New York City was at one and the same time both the apex of Western culture and the armpit of the Western world."
    In the 1970s New York City was not a part of the United States at all. It was an offshore interzone with no shopping malls, few major chains, no golf courses, no subdivisions. We thought of the place as a free city, where exiles and lamsters and refugees found shelter. Downtown we were proud of this, naturally.
    In Sante's book Kill All Your Darlings, he continues to riff on the city. There was, for instance, in Sante's terms, a fantasy New York, a canyon'd utopia taking shape in the gleam of postwar growth; but there was another, more everyday—a more used—New York.

    "The New York I lived in, on the other hand, was rapidly regressing," he writes. "It was a ruin in the making, and my friends and I were camped out amid its potsherds and tumuli. This did not distress me—quite the contrary. I was enthralled by decay and eager for more; ailanthus trees growing through cracks in the asphalt, ponds and streams forming in leveled blocks and slowly making their way to the shoreline, wild animals returning from centuries of exile."

    "At that time," Sante suggests, "much of Manhattan felt depopulated even in daylight."

    [Image: Otherwise unrelated to this post, photographer Marlis Momber explores an era in NYC when "entire blocks east of Avenue A consisted of little more than rubble-strewn lots"; photo by Michelle V. Agins for The New York Times].

    A nonhuman dimension was thus free to move into the metropolis. It became a city "where on winter nights troops of feral dogs would arrive to bed down on the heating grates."
    On Canal Street stood a five-story building empty of human tenants that had been taken over from top to bottom by pigeons. If you walked east on Houston Street from the Bowery on a summer night, the jungle growth of vacant blocks gave a foretaste of the impending wilderness, when lianas would engird the skyscrapers and mushrooms would cover Times Square.
    "The tenements," Sante adds, "were aspects of the natural landscape, like caves or rock ledges, across which all of us—inhabitants, landlords, dope dealers, beat cops, tourists—flitted for a few seasons, like the pigeons and the cockroaches and the rats, barely registering as individuals in the ceaseless churning of generations."

    This semi-feral city was less a topic of anthropology, we might say, than it was of natural history: an interzone of species, as well as human culture.
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