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Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper

Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper video paper music animation

Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper video paper music animation

Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper video paper music animation

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This great new video for Josh Ritter’s Love Is Making Its Way Back Home was directed by Erez Horovitz and involves the meticulous animation of over 12,000 laser-cut pieces of construction paper. Via Etsy:

A team of nearly twenty artists, editors, directors and product assistants ushered the video into being. The group started with storyboarding and computer animation before converting the digital graphics to paper cutouts (frame by frame), photographing those 12,000 cutouts and then stitching them together into four minutes of paper animation.

You can learn more about how it was done and see some great behind the scenes shots on Josh Ritter’s blog. (via etsy)

via Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper.

  • The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces
    Published: September 29, 2011
    Source: kottke.org

    A couple years ago, I pointed to a 10-minute clip of a longer documentary called The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces. Some kind soul has put the whole thing up on YouTube:

    This witty and original film is about the open spaces of cities and why some of them work for people while others don't. Beginning at New York's Seagram Plaza, one of the most used open areas in the city, the film proceeds to analyze why this space is so popular and how other urban oases, both in New York and elsewhere, measure up. Based on direct observation of what people actually do, the film presents a remarkably engaging and informative tour of the urban landscape and looks at how it can be made more hospitable to those who live in it.

    Tags: architecture   cities   design   NYC   The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces   video   William Whyte
  • Michael Murphy
    Published: September 28, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Michael Murphy Obama installation art

    Michael Murphy Obama installation art

    Michael Murphy Obama installation art

    Michael Murphy Obama installation art

    Michael Murphy Obama installation art

    Michael Murphy Obama installation art

    Michael Murphy Obama installation art

    Michael Murphy Obama installation art

    Michael Murphy’s solo show, LOOK, recently opened at gallery nine5 in New York. His artworks span a wide variety of media including multi-layered 3D sculptures, sound installations, and paintings with materials including nails, shadows, water, and sandblasted bullet-proof glass. Some of my favorite pieces are shown above, and you can see more in the show’s catalogue. Better yet, stop by gallery nine5 through October 6. (thnx, irina!)

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  • Sequence
    Published: September 27, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Sequence photography New York bridges

    Sequence photography New York bridges

    Sequence photography New York bridges

    Sequence photography New York bridges

    Sequence photography New York bridges

    A lovely photo series of New York’s Williamsburg Bridge by Brooklyn-based photographer Mon Zamora.

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  • Chemise Blanche
    Published: September 28, 2011
    Source: Style Bubble

    What London Fashion Week proffered up two weeks ago wasn't just the normal strengths of print and colour play but truly a broad range of designers that went with their own flow and had conviction in that.  Sure, the printists and texturists had a field day playing with surfaces but a breakout designer that shone amongst the pattern fest did it with a simple white shirt.

    Well, actually seventeen mens and seventeen womens shirts to be exact.  Palmer Harding may be a fresh name but Levi Palmer and Matthew Harding's combined experience in freelance work as well as their respective degrees in Central Saint Martins menswear BA and MA courses have created a steady footing for them to start their highly focused label.  When I went to visit them out in the super outer regions of London (zone 6 anyone???), I found the level of focus to be scarily high for such young dudes.  I had to applaud their pragmatism and sensible ways - they run their studio from Harding's family home (hence the non-E postcode), they've researched production options extensively so that they can take on orders (and I predict many will be buying into their core collection) and they have singularly honed in on what most consider to be a basic.  Playing it safe or steady shouldered thinking?  I'm going with the latter when you think of so many London young guns that have disappeared off the face of the earth leaving transient catwalk images from shows that probably burnt their budgets out. 

    Ultimately, what Palmer Harding are offering for S/S 12 is a desirable line of shirts, which have a stunning subtle point of difference that separates their shirts from the others.  You could apply Magritte's words here and say "Ceci n'est pas une chemise blanche".  Or you could go down the M&S route and go 'This isn't just ANY white shirt.  This is a Palmer Harding white shirt."  Inspired by photographer Ingar Krauss and 1930s couture detailing, Harding and Palmer employ various twists and turns to inject into the shirts creating wafts of volume, draping, pleating and metal fixtures that create the right shape as well as subtly referencing to Harding's MA collection.   This is all a far cry from the bulbous shapes that I road tested when I bought a piece from Harding's challenging collaboration with Topshop but I love that there are still lingering references from that collection.  Whilst mostly white, grey and a very very light shade of green are also used to prevent complete white-out.  No detail is superfluous or just there for decoration. 

    For me, there's a quiet strength in Palmer Harding's work that got me really excited when I saw it in person.  I can't quite put my finger on it but their approach seemed really refreshing and you feel somewhat assured that their debut will be a success.  Hope my enthusiasm hasn't jinxed anything.  Paris will be the real indicator as Palmer Harding take their collection to market this week.

    Palmer1

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    Palmer2

    IMG_5890

    Palmer3

    IMG_5891

    Palmer4

    IMG_5892

    Palmer5

    IMG_5893

    Palmer6

    IMG_5897

    Palmer7

    IMG_5899

    IMG_5899

    Palmer8

    IMG_5900

    IMG_5901

    Palmer9

    Palmer10

    IMG_5904

    Palmer11

    IMG_5907

    Palmer12

    Palmer Harding are already on the digital fast track with a film by the brilliant Malcolm Pate and styled by Love Magazine's Anders Sølvsten Thomsen...

  • Birds by Abby Diamond
    Published: September 28, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Birds by Abby Diamond illustration birds art

    Birds by Abby Diamond illustration birds art

    Birds by Abby Diamond illustration birds art

    Birds by Abby Diamond illustration birds art

    Spotted these beautiful ink and watercolor birds by Abby Diamond on Society6. Available as fine art prints.

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  • hitler-cat1.jpg (JPEG grafiği, 326x432 piksel)
    Published: September 27, 2011
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  • Soviet Fabrics, 1920s-1930s
    Published: September 26, 2011

    Thank you to English Russia

  • Esther Stocker.
    Published: September 27, 2011
  • 52hearts:pretty-bird: (via ubai) on vi.sualize.us
    Published: September 15, 2011
  • (4) Tumblr
    Published: September 20, 2011
  • Abandoned Organisation
    Published: September 19, 2011

    ‘Please don’t ask me where it is’

    - Pila Dotoshnaya

    All images by Pila Dotoshnaya

    Thank you to Pila Dotoshnaya

  • Pin and Thread Illustrations by Debbie Smyth
    Published: September 21, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Pin and Thread Illustrations by Debbie Smyth textiles needles installation illustration art

    Pin and Thread Illustrations by Debbie Smyth textiles needles installation illustration art

    Pin and Thread Illustrations by Debbie Smyth textiles needles installation illustration art

    Pin and Thread Illustrations by Debbie Smyth textiles needles installation illustration art

    Pin and Thread Illustrations by Debbie Smyth textiles needles installation illustration art

    Pin and Thread Illustrations by Debbie Smyth textiles needles installation illustration art

    Pin and Thread Illustrations by Debbie Smyth textiles needles installation illustration art

    Pin and Thread Illustrations by Debbie Smyth textiles needles installation illustration art

    I was floored to discover the work of UK artist Debbie Smyth who uses hundreds of needles and delicate lengths of thread to create wall-sized installations. Via her website:

    Debbie Smyth is textile artist most identifiable by her statement thread drawings; these playful yet sophisticated contemporary artworks are created by stretching a network of threads between accurately plotted pins. Her work beautifully blurs the boundaries between fine art drawings and textile art, flat and 3D work, illustration and embroidery, literally lifting the drawn line off the page in a series of “pin and thread” drawings.

    Incredibly beautiful work, I would love to see these up close. Here’s a video interview with Smyth as well as a timelapse of one of her most recent installations. (via joetta maue and rhumboogie)

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  • Landform Building
    Published: September 17, 2011
    Source: BLDGBLOG
    [Image: From Landform Building: Architecture's New Terrain, designed by Thumb Projects].

    This evening, Saturday, September 17, down at the BMW Guggenheim Lab, Marc McQuade and Stan Allen will be celebrating the release of their recent book Landform Building: Architecture's New Terrain, designed by Thumb Projects.

    [Image: From Landform Building: Architecture's New Terrain, designed by Thumb Projects].

    The book is a sustained look at "the evolving relationship between architecture and landscape," with a specific focus on geomorphic megastructures—that is, buildings that look like mountains and other earth forms—vegetative ornament, including green roofs, and complex interpenetrations between architecture and the surface of the earth (semi-subterranean structures, structures penetrated by bedrock, and so forth).

    You can see some shots of the book itself here—

    [Images: From Landform Building: Architecture's New Terrain, designed by Thumb Projects; see more].

    —and you'll learn much more about the publication at tonight's book launch. There, you'll hear from McQuade and Allen themselves, but also from Alejandro Zaera-Polo, Lucia Allais, Eric Sanderson, and Nina Katchadourian.

    [Image: Landform Building launch at the BMW Guggenheim Lab].

    I'm excited to be participating in this evening's event, as well, with a short, pecha kucha-style presentation, looking at everything from constructed hills in Rome to artificial glaciers, and from the particularly vertiginous paranoia of a manmade earth to Celtic myths of the Hollow Hills. The quasi-mystical appeal of ground-penetrating radar, muon detectors in the rain forest, and methane-ventilation technology used in landfill construction will all make brief appearances.

    Things kick off at 6pm; here is a map. Hope to see some of you there!
  • L'emploi du temps
    Published: September 18, 2011
  • Corner Portraits by Irving Penn
    Published: September 20, 2011

    Truman Capote

    ‘Irving Penn (1917 –  2009) was an American photographer known for his portraiture and fashion photography. He was among the first photographers to pose subjects against a simple grey or white backdrop. Expanding his austere studio surroundings, Penn constructed a set of upright angled backdrops, to form a stark, acute corner.’

    - Wikipedia

    Salvador Dali

    Marlene Dietrich

    Marcel Duchamp

    Gypsy Rose Lee

    Joe Louis

    Georgia O'Keeffe

    Mrs. William Rhinelander Stewart

    Igor Stravinsky

    Spencer Tracy

    Duchess of Windsor

    Ballet Society

    Thank you to the Irving Penn foundation

  • With great respect, Marge Simpson
    Published: September 19, 2011
    Barbara Bush received a letter from the unlikeliest of sources in 1990, after an article in People magazine quoted the First Lady as saying The Simpsons "was the dumbest thing [she] had ever seen." Marge Simpson's polite response can be seen below, followed by the transcript of an apologetic letter from Barbara Bush in reply.

    It's worth noting that tensions between the two families resurfaced two years later, when Barbara's husband, then-U.S. President George H. W. Bush, promised, "We're going to keep trying to strengthen the American family. To make them more like the Waltons and less like the Simpsons." A reply from Springfield soon materialised in the form of this addition to the show's opening sequence.

    As mentioned, transcripts of both Marge's letter and Barbara's reply follow. Image courtesy of The Washington Post. Many thanks to Josh Conrad for suggesting it.



    Transcript
    THE SIMPSONS™

    September 28, 1990

    Mrs. Barbara Bush
    The First Lady
    The White House
    1600 Pennsylvania Avenue
    Washington, D.C.

    Dear First Lady:

    I recently read your criticism of my family. I was deeply hurt. Heaven knows we're far from perfect and, if truth be known, maybe just a wee bit short of normal; but as Dr. Seuss says, "a person is a person".

    I try to teach my children Bart, Lisa, and even little Maggie, always to give somebody the benefit of the doubt and not talk badly about them, even if they're rich. It's hard to get them to understand this advice when the very First Lady in the country calls us not only dumb, but "the dumbest thing" she ever saw. Ma'am, if we're the dumbest thing you ever saw, Washington must be a good deal different than what they teach me at the current events group at the church.

    I always believed in my heart that we had a great deal in common. Each of us living our lives to serve an exceptional man. I hope there is some way out of this controversy. I thought, perhaps, it would be a good start to just speak my mind.

    With great respect,

    (Signed)

    Marge Simpson

    Barbara Bush's response:
    Dear Marge,

    How kind of you to write. I'm glad you spoke your mind; I foolishly didn't know you had one.

    I am looking at a picture of you, depicted on a plastic cup, with your blue hair filled with pink birds peeking out all over. Evidently, you and your charming family — Lisa, Homer, Bart and Maggie — are camping out. It is a nice family scene. Clearly you are setting a good example for the rest of the country.

    Please forgive a loose tongue.

    Warmly,

    Barbara Bush

    P.S. Homer looks like a handsome fella!

  • Money Trees
    Published: September 10, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Money Trees trees plants currency

    Money Trees trees plants currency

    Money Trees trees plants currency

    Money Trees trees plants currency

    Money Trees trees plants currency

    Money Trees trees plants currency

    Money Trees trees plants currency

    Money Trees trees plants currency

    As perhaps a companion piece to last week’s skull nickels, here’s yet another thing I had no idea existed. Apparently in several wooded areas around the UK, passersby have been stopping for decades (if not centuries), meticulously hammering small denomination coins intro trees. Most of the trees seem to be in and around Cumbria and Portmeirion, and I didn’t find a single example of a tree like this located outside the UK. According to this recent article by the BBC, the practice might date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the tree would take away their sickness. The practice seems akin to love padlocks or Americans collaborative effort of sticking their nasty ass gum all over everything. (photos courtesy shaun whiteman, drew, ken werwerka, rachel bibby, paul moriss, ministry, donald mcdougal, heartbeeps, via lustik and hrtbps)

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  • The Shape of War
    Published: September 12, 2011
    Source: BLDGBLOG
    I'm excited to invite everyone to another evening at Studio-X NYC, with photographer Simon Norfolk and journalist Noah Shachtman, who will participate in two back-to-back live interviews discussing new spaces and technologies of conflict in the 21st century.

    [Image: Photo by Simon Norfolk, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan].

    Long-term readers of BLDGBLOG will remember Simon Norfolk from his interview here on the site back in 2006.

    [Image: Photo by Simon Norfolk, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan].

    Tuesday's conversation will revisit many of those same themes, but it will do so in the provocative context of Norfolk's newest project, a photographic tour of Afghanistan in the footsteps of photographer John Burke:
    In October 2010, Simon Norfolk began a series of new photographs in Afghanistan, which takes its cue from the work of nineteenth-century British photographer John Burke. Norfolk’s photographs reimagine or respond to Burke’s Afghan war scenes in the context of the contemporary conflict. Conceived as a collaborative project with Burke across time, this new body of work is presented alongside Burke’s original portfolios.
    We will take a look not only at the resulting photographs—a selection of which appear here—but at the often overlapping responsibilities of the photojournalist and the artist in documenting political events in conflict zones around the world.

    [Image: Photo by Simon Norfolk, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan].

    As you can see in the photos reproduced here, Norfolk has an eye for complex stratigraphy: where US and UK basecamps overlap with Afghan townscapes, which in turn visually—and politically—repeat earlier scenes from a different era of misbegotten imperial adventures in Central Asia.

    It is all simply "a cycle of imperial history," Norfolk suggests, one in which a "lack of historical perspective on the part of the West allows them to blunder back for the fourth time thinking that you can turn Afghans into western liberal democrats and feminists by bombing them." Norfolk doesn't mince words: "the prosecution of the war makes me furious," he explains in a long conversation hosted on his website.

    [Images: Photos by Simon Norfolk, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan].

    Noah Shachtman's reputation as a journalist and editor has been firmly solidified over nearly a decade. Beginning with DefenseTech, a site Shachtman founded in 2003, and continuing with the current reign of Wired's Danger Room, Shachtman has been prolific, engaged, and highly active in helping to set the agenda for national defense coverage in the post-9/11 world.

    [Images: Photos by Simon Norfolk, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan].

    We'll be asking Shachtman about everything from the limits of the battlefield—where war chaotically begins and unclearly ends—to new technologies of surveillance, and from the strategic requirements of a journalist covering today's sites of conflict to the possible urban futures Shachtman might detect in current military headlines.

    [Images: Photos by Simon Norfolk, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan].

    I'm genuinely looking forward to this, and hope to see many of you there. The format will be as follows. From 6:30pm to shortly after 7pm, we will be engaging with Simon Norfolk in a live interview about his work; then, till roughly 7:40pm, we will be interviewing Noah Shachtman. These will be stand-alone interviews, conducted back-to-back.

    The final stretch of the night, from 7:45 to 8:30pm or so, will be an open conversation with both Norfolk and Shachtman, featuring questions from anyone who might have them. This will allow us to discuss similarities and differences between their work, and to tease out other themes that might have been passed over in the individual interviews.

    [Image: Photo by John Burke, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan by Simon Norfolk].

    Unfortunately, I have to ask that you RSVP to studioxnyc [at] gmail [dot] com if you plan to attend. Otherwise, the event is free and open to the public.

    You will find us at 180 Varick Street, Suite 1610, in Manhattan. Here is a map.

    [Images: Photos by Simon Norfolk, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan].

    Meanwhile, please feel free to go back through BLDGBLOG's interview with Simon Norfolk in full—it's one of my personal favorites on the site, and is a great read—and to click through Noah Shachtman's own website, including the overall resources of Danger Room.

    [Image: Photo by Simon Norfolk, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan].

    As Norfolk says in the BLDGBLOG interview, and which perhaps serves as a useful conceptual umbrella for the entire forthcoming evening:
    All of the work that I’ve been doing over the last five years is about warfare and the way war makes the world we live in. War shapes and designs our society. The landscapes that I look at are created by warfare and conflict. This is particularly true in Europe. I went to the city of Cologne, for instance, and the city of Cologne was built by Charlemagne—but Cologne has the shape that it does today because of the abilities and non-abilities of a Lancaster Bomber. It comes from what a Lancaster can do and what a Lancaster can't do. What it cannot do is fly deep into Germany in the middle of the day and pinpoint-bomb a ball bearing factory. What it can do is fly to places that are quite near to England, that are five miles across, on a bend in the river, under moonlight, and then hit them with large amounts of H.E.. And if you do that, you end up with a city that looks like Cologne—the way the city's shaped.

    So I started off in Afghanistan photographing literal battlefields—but I'm trying to stretch that idea of what a battlefield is. Because all the interesting money now—the new money, the exciting stuff—is about entirely new realms of warfare: inside cyberspace, inside parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Eavesdropping, intelligence, satellite warfare, imaging—this is where all the exciting stuff is going to happen in twenty years' time. So I wanted to stretch that idea of what a battleground could be. What is a landscape—a surface, an environment, a space—created by warfare?
    I hope to see you at 6:30pm on Tuesday, September 13th.

    [Image: Photo by Simon Norfolk, from Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan].
  • This is bullet-proof human skin - made from spider silk and goat milk. Yes, really. [Video]
    Published: August 15, 2011
    Source: io9
    Jalila Essaidi is testing the limits of human endurance, and it starts by having to milk spider-goats. Spider goats are otherwise innocent-looking goats that have been genetically engineered to produce milk packed with the protein made in spider's silk. (There is no definitive proof that this also gives them a propensity to skitter up walls or hide out in your sock drawer, but I think it does.) More »
  • tumblr_lmrlsuomqn1qzffuro1_500.jpg (500×671)
    Published: August 15, 2011
  • Learn How to Hide Things in Plain Sight with the Secret Hiding Places Manual [Security]
    Published: August 16, 2011
    Source: Lifehacker
    Looking for a place to stash some cash, jewelry, or other valuable objects? Your home offers plenty of hiding spaces, and the Construction of Secret Hiding Places is a free manual that will teach you how to use or make them. More »


  • Лепрозорий / Убежище
    Published: August 12, 2011
  • GIF | Tumblr
    Published: August 9, 2011
  • Frances Bean Cobain, All Grown Up
    Published: August 8, 2011
    Source: Stereogum

    Frances Bean Cobain has done a pretty good job staying out of the spotlight, but now that’s she’s all grown up — goth, inked, and gorgeous — we may be seeing more of her. The child of Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love (who lost custody of her two years ago) turns 19 this month, and has been pursuing visual art and the occasional music project in addition to modeling. (Remember, Ryan Adams stole her trust fund so you may wanna buy some of her work.) Frances recently posed for these artistically grungy B&W photos by Hedi Slimane; take a look, it’ll make you feel old.

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  • Blooming Structures by Sivan Royz
    Published: August 4, 2011
    Source: Design Milk

    Blooming Structures by Sivan Royz

    Made of laser-cut silk pieces, these delicate objects are brought together by string, taking their shapes from nature.

    Sivan Royz is a textile designer from Israel whose latest project, Blooming Structures, is a beautiful series of textile sculpture that also double as jewelry and accessories.

    The white objects are small purses or pouches to hold an iPhone or a lipstick. The colored objects are a neck piece and a bracelet, which react to the body’s movements.

    Blooming Structures by Sivan Royz

    Blooming Structures by Sivan Royz

    Blooming Structures by Sivan Royz

    Blooming Structures by Sivan Royz

    Blooming Structures by Sivan Royz

    Blooming Structures by Sivan Royz

    Blooming Structures by Sivan Royz


    Share This: Twitter | Facebook | Discover more great design by following Design Milk on Twitter and Facebook.
    © 2011 Design Milk | Posted by Jaime in Art, Style & Fashion, Technology | Permalink | No comments
  • ‘Brand-New’ 1949 Claud Butler Cycle
    Published: August 4, 2011

    I came across this set of photos –  not a restored bike, but a ’brand new’ 1949 Claud Butler built from a cache of original, unused parts found by Jim Cunningham, ‘Founder, President and Chief Flunky Officer of CyclArt.It’s a beauty, isn’t it?’

    - Rich Johnson

  • Youngstown Steel Mill 1953
    Published: August 2, 2011


    Youngstown Steel Mill 1953

  • The Hilariously Bad Disguises of the German Secret Police [Espionage]
    Published: August 4, 2011
    Source: Gizmodo
    Check out these great cold war-era photos of some totally normal East German citizens, who are definitely not members of the secret police! How innocuous they are, these completely non-suspicious-looking gentlemen, who could not possibly be Stasi officers in disguise, especially not the fellow in sunglasses and the enormous fur coat with the upturned collar. Nope, just some regular guys. More »


  • Digging a Hole to the Other Side of the World
    Published: July 14, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Digging a Hole to the Other Side of the World installation gardening art
    (click images for detail)

    Digging a Hole to the Other Side of the World installation gardening art

    Digging a Hole to the Other Side of the World installation gardening art

    Digging a Hole to the Other Side of the World installation gardening art

    Digging a Hole to the Other Side of the World installation gardening art

    Remember as a child, plopped down in a sandbox with a few trucks and a shovel, when you suddenly struck on the brilliant idea of digging straight down through the Earth, all the way to China? What would you find there? Berlin-based firm Topotek1 keeps that dream alive with their latest installation for the 2011 Xi’an International Horticultural Exposition. The Big Dig is a an enormous hole that simulates an audio connection with Sweden, Argentina, the United States and Germany. While standing at the edge “soundtracks of the life on the other side: cows from the pampas of Argentinas, commuters rushing among transit through New York City, the maritime life of Stockholm, and layers of history so audible among the streets of Berlin. These soundtracks pique the imagination of the visitors, transferring them away from China, away from the garden.” A glass barrier prevents exposition visitors from “becoming too curious” however it would be amazing to see the space with an unobstructed view and imagine sliding down the sloping green surface and finding yourself on the other end. Images by Geng Weng courtesy Topotek1. (via pruned)

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  • Paper Sculptures by Vally Nomidou
    Published: July 18, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Paper Sculptures by Vally Nomidou sculpture paper art

    Paper Sculptures by Vally Nomidou sculpture paper art

    Paper Sculptures by Vally Nomidou sculpture paper art

    Paper Sculptures by Vally Nomidou sculpture paper art

    Paper Sculptures by Vally Nomidou sculpture paper art

    Paper Sculptures by Vally Nomidou sculpture paper art

    Paper Sculptures by Vally Nomidou sculpture paper art

    Greek artist Vally Nomidou creates these delicate life-size sculptures of women and girls using paper and cardboard. Via the exhibition page:

    Paper, Nomidou’s dominant material, now becomes a key component in her creative process, inextricably linked to painful and systematic research on the technical level, as well as on that of aesthetic integration. The artist respects her material and, although it is cheap and vulnerable, she does not “adulterate” it by using other materials. Moreover, she does not use it as a shell, an encasing to cover a necessary inner structure by providing a fake, idealised skin. Nomidou builds and shapes her works from the inside out solely using paper and paperboard. The internal cardboard frame is built with a vertical and horizontal grid in order to be able to support and render stillness in her sculptures, while also ensuring balance in contraction and expansion.

    To me her sculptures appear to be three dimensional collages, the paper-based media mixing and intertwining, occasionally embedded with flowers, jewelry and other materials. Yet somehow they retain incredibly life-like forms, perfectly proportioned. See more from this series entitled “Let it Bleed“. (via acidolatte)

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  • The house of mechanical animals
    Published: July 20, 2011
    Source: BLDGBLOG
    The new film Convento documents work by Christiaan Zwanikken, an artist who preserves and literally reanimates dead animals using recycled motor parts and pumps rescued from scrapyards. He then "breeds these new species in a 400-year old monastery in Portugal," which his family has been restoring for the past 25 years.

    [Image: A still from Convento].

    As Film Threat describes the process, dead creatures found around the grounds are "turned into new beings" by Zwanikken—for instance, the film shows "a chattering bird skull extended on a metal rotating pole," and later there are "rabbit skulls on the end of two servos that twist and turn and then unexpectedly bash together, as if they were fighting in the afterlife." Elsewhere, a "metallic ant sits in an outdoor walkway, head twisting and listening for its next prey," and all of this is amidst "some of the most beautiful backgrounds you can imagine," with the monastery perched on a cliffside over a nearby river.

    In fact, the film is made unusually compelling precisely by its setting: a monastery (where everyday life was once run like clockwork), a site of moral and religious significance now repurposed to house monstrous animals resurrected as machines.

    Not all of the creatures just stand there, however, demonstrating their own ingenuity: Zwanikken has also built an elaborate mechanical donkey that walks around in circles, hauling up buckets of water from the monastery's well. Indeed, the film's director, Jarred Alterman, explains why the donkey was his favorite thing to film:
    Hundreds of years ago, donkeys were essential creatures for farming. The donkey had to be blindfolded, and it walked in a circle for 12 hours a day, pulling up water from a 15-meter-deep well, probably exhausted from heat. It's incredible that Christiaan was able to understand the sensitivity and the history and create a mechanical animal that made reference to the importance of the animal, and create an artwork at the same time. It's more about the animals than it is about robots.
    Zwanikken himself elaborates on how these creatures are made:
    I like the idea of recycling, so I collect a lot of materials from dumps. But the crucial parts—motors, gears and bearings—I try to buy new so they can be easily replaced. I use servo motors, hydraulics, pneumatics, stepper motors, electromagnetic devices, propellers, water pumps, combustion engines—basically anything that can be used to create movement. To control them, I use microcontrollers, tons of basic stamps, animatronic software, PCs, remote control and custom-built electronics. I salvage a lot of electronic parts from other machines. Most of the creations are stand-alone and have their own little brain that I program. The more complex pieces are interactive and have motion sensors, radar or ultrasonic sensors.
    They are part of what Popular Science calls, in an unrelated context, a "new robotic phylogenesis."

    In some ways, I'm reminded of Liam Young's Specimens of Unnatural History.

    [Image: From Specimens of Unnatural History by Liam Young].

    Young has written that, "as we stalk the strange and unfamiliar landscapes of robotics, biotechnology and ubiquitous computing, we are beginning to encounter a new form of engineered nature that we are not yet able to categorize." His taxidermied hybrids thus populate these landscapes, arriving somewhere between technical objects—invented not evolved—and wondrous new organisms, monstrous yet beautiful in their singularity.

    Perhaps this is the next nature we all face: reclusive inventors releasing newly assembled drone-animals into forests, lakes, and hunting grounds around the world—as spectacular as they are unearthly—and your children's children will wake each morning to the dawn chorus of precisely engineered winged machines, exquisite mockeries of birds our generation will be the last to know.

    (Liam Young's Specimens of Unnatural History will be on display as part of "Landscape Futures: Instruments, Devices and Architectural Inventions" at the Nevada Museum of Art, opening 13 August 2011. For a thinly related old post, see The House of Memory and Automata. Convento spotted via Filmmaker Magazine).
  • Massimal Made from 20,000 Zip Ties
    Published: July 20, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    Massimal Made from 20,000 Zip Ties installation art animals

    Massimal Made from 20,000 Zip Ties installation art animals

    Massimal Made from 20,000 Zip Ties installation art animals

    Massimal Made from 20,000 Zip Ties installation art animals

    Massimal Made from 20,000 Zip Ties installation art animals

    New York design firm Design Office Takebayashi Scroggin (D.O.T.S.) created this Massimal for the 2011 Beaux Arts Festival using 20,000 standard white zip ties. Wait, “massimal”? The firm describes a massimal as “design objects that serve as prototypes to examine how physical form can engage the public realm. These constructs are mass abstractions of animal forms fabricated in systematic fashion from one material.” So there you go. The zip ties are meticulously interlinked creating a complex outer mesh that is then suspended in place using cables. Photos by GLINTstudios. (via designboom)

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  • China in a Mirror
    Published: July 26, 2011
    Source: Colossal

    China in a Mirror photography China

    China in a Mirror photography China

    China in a Mirror photography China

    China in a Mirror photography China

    China in a Mirror photography China

    I’m loving the symmetry created in these mirror photographs of urban China by Austrian designer and photographer Atelier Olschinsky. See the entire series here, and his recently published illustrations entitled Game Zone are pretty mind-blowing as well.

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SUMMER SAMPLE SALE

Heatwaves are good for cool deals on new duds…or at least some A/C. Luckily, we have both!

Come by our sample sale this week – starts tomorrow at 10AM.

w/ our friends Hyden Yoo, Rogan, Shae, and 80%20.

Everything is 60-90% off !! Hope to see you here !!!

DESIGNERS
GAR—DE
HYDEN YOO
ROGAN
SHAE
80%20

DATES/HOURS
WED 7/13 – 10AM to 7PM
THU 7/14 – 10AM to 7PM
FRI 7/15 – 10AM to 7PM
SAT 7/16 – 10AM to 5PM

LOCATION
135 W 36TH ST – 14TH FLOOR (b/t Broadway + 7th Ave)
NEW YORK NY 10018